Friday, November 19, 2010

Online Pitches

So, I'm slowly but surely getting my act together, gathering all the lessons I learned during MuseCon. And today, I'm finally sharing one with you. Although I did not participate, I did listen in on a chat room pitch session lesson.

These were the instructions given to the participants. If you've never partaken in an online pitch session, I think they are good specifics to know before hand.

1) Introduce yourself, using your real name not your username for the forum

2) Begin pitching with title, genre, word count, page count each in a separate line giving the agent time to read and become acclimated with you and the work you're offering.

3) Paste your 250 word pitch in small increments. This gives the agent time to read and formulate questions he/she might have for you. Don't paste your 250 words all at the same time.

4) Next comes your credentials, if any, and any marketing you've mapped out for your specific genre: i.e., where it would fit.

5) Type DONE when you are finished. This cues the agent that you're finished and he/she can now ask questions.

6) Once finished, they will either say 'no thank you' or request material. If material is requested, respond in a timely fashion and make sure to put in the subject area of your response the conference they requested your material from.

7) You should have a query and synopsis all ready, just in case. Where the synopsis is concerned, have a short one available. They possibly could ask you to 'read' it--paste it then and there.

Have any of you pitched online before?? How'd it go?

22 comments:

  1. No, I've never pitched online before - I've never even heard of such a thing. Thanks for sharing the instructions, that's very good stuff to know in case I ever do get the opportunity.

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  2. No, but this is very interesting. Thanks.

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  3. No, I haven't, though I've entered some of the blogger contests. I haven't won yet. I'm thinking the traditional querying method may work better for me and tell about my book better. I learn a lot from reading other people's pitches.

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  4. No, I haven't. I didn't even know you could. Ha. Oh well. You learn something new every day ...

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  5. Whoa. Awesome new layout Sheri!

    I've never even heard of this. Cool concept.

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  6. I'm with everyone else. I didn't know such things existed. I've only heard of pitches happening at live conferences (and during blog contests).

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  7. You can pitch to agents online?

    That is a whole new level of stress I'm not sure I could handle. Egads!

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  8. Yeah, guys, it was way cool. They emailed anyone interested and writers got to chose a time slot. The session I peeked in on was a practice session between the facilitators of the conference and the scheduled writers. It was really interesting and insightful.

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  9. I'm so bad at pitching. I can write a good query but a pitch just confuses me!

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  10. I gave a one line pitch in a writing conference group. The author said, "Yes, that's how it's done." I was so excited I forgot what I said before I wrote it down. =)

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  11. I never knew you could pitch online like this. Thanks for the tips.

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  12. This sounds awesome, I'm sorry I missed it! I haven't pitched online like this before but it sounds like fun.

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  13. I pitched online for the Muse conference. Let me tell you, I was actually more nervous for that than I was pitching face-to-face! The agent was really nice, after I posted my pitch, she asked some questions, what book it was like, and then asked me for a partial. She ultimately rejected but it was definitely a positive experience for me. :)

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  14. This is so very cool. Never pitched online berfore. Thanks for the info.

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  15. I pitched for the Muse Conference too. My fingers were so nervous they could barely type. Then the agent asked me some questions, which I stammered around and answered. She declined but was very nice about it.

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  16. hi miss sheri! pitching on line sounds pretty scary. its sorta like being with someone but not seeing how they could look at you. for me i could rather do it in person. i could want to get rejected by someone looking at me with a smile.
    ...hugs from lenny

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  17. Wow! Scary! But maybe less so than a face to face? I don't know. I guess I might prefer the face to face. I like to be able to read people's faces. But man, cool breakdown! Thanks for posting this. I didn't even realize this sort of thing happened!

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  18. I haven't done this, but these sound like great pointers! I'll have to bookmark this page!

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  19. Great tips on online pitching :) I've heard of it but never had the opportunity to take part.

    Rach

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  20. Sheri, that sounded like you had a great experience! I've only pitched once face-to-face with an agent (last spring at the Pikes Peak Writers Conference), and it was a hoot!

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  21. Hey, I'm a new follower. I found you through Jessica Bell. I am with the rest of the group, I didn't know online pitches existed! I guess I should kick my WIP into shape. Thanks for the post!

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