Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Twisted Tuesday: REWRITING, Step 3

So it's official. I completed my rewrite.
Totally.
In full.
All done.
Finished.
Tout est fait. I typed: THE END.

Just over 76,000 words, successfully incorporating an added plot twist, upped the unique voice element, axed characters, a change from past tense to present tense, a few personalized descriptives enhancing character development, and new possibilities for book II and III.

Yeah, I'm pretty psyched. Now, I'll be looking over beta reads and edits, and have one amazing author friends (waves at AE) yet to read, but I'm on the homestretch, readying to send my baby out into the great beyond and excited to start work on both my MG fantasies and picture books.

That's my ROW80 PROGRESS report.  Please take a gander over to my ROW80 motivation partners and encourage them in their writing progress: Susan's PROGRESSMargo's PROGRESSC.Lee's PROGRESS.

I have more to say about completing my REwrite, but I did promise to continue the discussion on REwriting from where we left off last week. So here goes:

In STEP 1, we examined our reasons for choosing to REwrite instead of REvising. STEP 2, we chatted about breaking the process of rewriting into scenes, and I introduced my index card method. If you haven't read them you may need to because this post is simply moving forward with the next steps in the process. Feel free to take a peek. We'll wait.

So, moving on to STEP 3.

SPLIT SCREEN:

4. I already have a new document opened which I've entitled Workspace: 'Title of Book', and cut and pasted the existing scene into that blank space. Now, I open up another blank document and start the scene from scratch, always having the old scene there as a reference--aka SPLIT SCREEN. Yes, I know there are programs out there to do such things, but this is easy, right in front of me, and I won't have to convert any material to a Word doc. when it's time to submit to an agent, publisher, or editor. 


I want to note that starting the scene from scratch means physically writing a new opening line with new intrigue, pulling the reader into the scene & chapter. This also helps me switch gears to a new mindset for where I want this REwrite to take the audience.


5. After I've written maybe the first two 'ish' paragraphs, I start referencing the index cards I've developed--the ones with the important elements from the original draft I know must be in the scene as well as the index cards of new info I want to weave throughout the scene, chapter, and eventually the story.


6. As I utilize my index card notes, I'm constantly referencing my document labeled Workspace: 'Title of Book.' Sometimes I find a dialog tag or descriptive that seems perfect for where I am in the scene. Waste not want not, right? By doing this, I'm also analyzing myself as a writer. I see where I've been and watch myself edit my own material, giving it life in a more consistent and concise way.

7. Then, I layer voice and description and elements to enhance the scene just as I did when filling out my simple index cards.

Next time, I'll refer to #6 above more specifically. How through this complete manuscript REwrite I've seen myself grow through dialog. J

I've also decided to slow down on blogging so I can get these beta reads and edits completed. I'll keep posting on Tuesdays and probably sporadically. My best as always and tapping fingers and feet....

23 comments:

  1. Congrats on finishing. That's awesome.

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  2. Congrats on the completion of the rewrite! I'm smack dab in the middle of one those myself (though you'll never catch me attempting present tense, no way Jose!)so I can totally relate to what a relief/reward it must be to know you're done with it.

    And those are some very detailed steps on rewriting. You're such a helpful one. ;o)

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  3. Congrats on THE END!! That is awesome.

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  4. YAY! A huge congrats for a job well done! Hope you take a bit of time to celebrate. :)

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  5. Yay on reaching the end of your rewrite! And I like the split screen method - I've done something similar on a rewrite, but not as cool. Just moving things around in a single document. I'm going to steal your idea next time! :)

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  6. Woohoo! Congrats on The End! Best feeling every. =)

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  7. Isn't writing "The End" just awesome? Congrats on finishing! And, thanks for posting all this stuff on REwriting!

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  8. 76,000!!!!! You are da bomb, Sheri. Is da bomb out of date slang? Oh well, you know what I mean. Very impressive.

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  9. All right Sheri! What a great feeling to be done... Thanks for the tips and good luck on your other work.

    I am still on my final edit on my latest novel. I have been a bad boy, not working on it as much as I should...LOL

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  10. Three cheers for finishing!! I go about rewriting in a similar way. The process is about a hundred times easier since I got Scrivener. I'm not sure I could rewrite again without the ease of having everything in one place!

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  11. Congrats on getting your rewrites done! Whoo hoo! That is such an amazing feeling. I'm in the beginning stages of editing one of my novels now. You've inspired me!

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  12. loud cheers! you finished!! I send great waves of admiration your way...

    That re-write process is making a lot of sense, now. I've never been an index card girl, but I really should try, you make it sound very practical and helpful.

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  13. Congratulations on finishing your REwrite!! Woot woot :) I love reading your thoughts on re-writing since that's where I'm at in my manuscript, you're always so helpful and I learn something everytime I visit!

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  14. Congrats on finishing the rewrite!

    Pretty much the only thing that stayed from my first draft after I rewrote was the end and the inspiration for the structure. Oh and the beginning. But I'm going to ax that during revisions. :-)

    Good luck with your edits. Let me know if you need a CP.

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  15. Get that baby out there!!!! Woo hoo. I'll be cheering for you, but not in uniform...

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  16. that's a really great idea to take each scene seperately and flush it out!

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  17. I'll be cheering for you along with Samantha. *tosses her an extra set of pom-poms* :D

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  18. *happy dance*

    Congratulations on finishing! I know you've worked so hard on this. And thanks so much for your notes on how you whipped your wip into shape.

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  19. Congrats on finishing your rewrite!! :)

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  20. Yahooooo! Congratulations, sweetie! That's such a huge accomplishment. So happy for you. Looking forward to hearing of the next steps in your progress.

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  21. Congrats on finishing and thanks for describing your rewrite method~ great tips for me, yay!

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  22. Congrats on finishing the rewrite!

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