Wednesday, April 15, 2015

The Road To Wisdom

Writerly Wisdom Wednesdays, posted on the third Wednesday of the month, is a regular meme for writers to share lessons they've learned along their path to publication and beyond. I haven't used it in forever. But I noticed that last year was tough on a lot of us, so I decided to bring it back to the forefront. Feel free to join me! The only requirement is that the post be brief. 

image credit
There are days when all seems bright and airy. Then again, some are filled with doom and gloom. And with the fast-pace of life today, the two can sometimes blur. The one certain we have is the current moment we're living in. Right now. Yeah, that one. Other than that nothing is assured. 

A multitude of variables bombard us each day that influence, affect, and change our activities, goals, attitudes, and motivations. I don't know about you, but every time I think my day is going smoothly WHAM! the unexpected happens. Wisdom: The unexpected really should be expected. 

Although this quote could be relative to many people in numerous different walks of life, it is a hard-fast truth for writers. I could spend a dozen posts on methods of deciding whether to remain steadfast with a manuscript or shelf it; that will be for another day. The most valuable lesson I've learned about writing is that loving the craft will not always feel good. It's sacrifice. 

So tell me: what's the wisest writing advice you've been given? 

 photo Sheri2.png

21 comments:

  1. To keep at it. When in my heart, I'm not into it, do it anyway.

    ReplyDelete
  2. That's great advice and you're right, it applies to a lot of areas in life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for dropping by, Natalie. Major congratulations on the recognition you and Casey recently received. So thrilled for you!

      Delete
  3. In other words, we really should see it coming...

    ReplyDelete
  4. If only it was easy to always love the things we love, but I guess if it was, we wouldn't truly understand what love is. The wisest advice I received was to not be in a hurry. When I look back at my early writing, I'm glad I listened.

    Scribbles From Jenn - Visiting from the A to Z Challenge

    ReplyDelete
  5. I shelved my first ms, because....well for a lot of reasons, one of which was I fell out of love with it. But the funny thing is, I think about it more now that it's shelved, then when I was working on it. There's still this little voice in the back of my head that asks me to open it back up..... should I listen? Should I not? Sometimes I wish things could be as simple as a coin toss. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think we all feel this from time to time. Flipping a coin would be nice, eh? :) In this case, I honestly believe that it was a good thing to shelf it for a bit; however, if it haunts you there is no harm in revisiting you. It's amazing what time away from a manuscript can do for that piece of work. Best of luck with your decision.

      Delete
  6. "It's sacrifice." So true! We sacrifice a lot as writers. It doesn't always come easy, but it's worth it.

    ReplyDelete
  7. To write because I need to, not because I'm looking for remuneration, because that might never come. Sadly, very true :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. One writer told me never give advice. I try not to, but I do say things like, "Don't give up."

    ReplyDelete
  9. The best advice I got was from my sister who said "Writers write. You should be writing." It was the kick in the pants I needed to get going.

    ReplyDelete
  10. This is timely for me. I had thought I would be shelving a manuscript I queried last year, but have just recently decided to revise it again. It'll be slowly, and in between other projects, but I won't be giving up on it anytime soon. And I'm glad! =)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Love it, inject the passion for it, persevere.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Writing can definitely be a roller coaster ride! Great post! In my book the gates to the house say Fear Not the Unexpected! :) It ties into the story- so I love the quote you shared.
    ~Jess

    ReplyDelete
  13. Very timely for me to read this now! I'm learning to live in the flow of the chaos of life instead of fighting the current. "The unexpected really should be expected." Love that! :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Nice bit of wisdom. One thing I keep in mind that a teacher told me: write with passion. From just beyond what you "know" and with the rough brush of emotion.

    ReplyDelete
  15. One of the best writing things that happened to me last year was also the worst. I'm so thankful to my critique partners and writing friends for enlightening me about a certain agent. I've always trusted to easily, but thanks to my girls...I now (probably overly) investigate agents and publishers and make sure there are no red flags before I consider querying them.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I think the best writing advice I ever got was to start the next draft with a printed copy and a blank page, because you are more likely to make big changes. I don't always do this anymore. (Though sometimes I still do). But it helped me learn how to make big changes. I added a character in Peace that may not have happened any other way, and readers are always shocked to learn she wasn't in the first draft.
    Sheri--I heard you recently did a post on self publishing. Could you send me the link? I think it would be helfpful for me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's very good advice! I've started doing that myself. I find seeing the manuscript (chapter, paragraphs, etc...) in hand definitely helps me fish through the good and the bad.

      Delete
  17. I visited your #IWSG but hope you don't mind I'm leaving a comment on this one, instead. In fact, I Pinned the picture that goes with this post.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I visited your #IWSG but hope you don't mind I'm leaving a comment on this one, instead. In fact, I Pinned the picture that goes with this post.

    ReplyDelete

!SPLAT Your Awesomeness! I love to hear from you!

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails

MY STATS